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Pairing Wine and Food – a Primer for the Holidays

2017-12-08 10:12:33
Thanks to the "Working Girls" at Olympic Cellars Winery for this "sip"sational primer on pairing holiday foods and the perfect wine! Just in time for our annual listing of just a few of the many delicious Thanksgiving feasts being prepared all around the LOOP. YUM! If you can’t visit Olympic Cellars, and  all the other OCL member wine and cideries this weekend for the annual Harvest Wine Tour, Olympic Cellars has put together a few suggestions and a three pack wine special to help you on your way.  This party pack of Dungeness White Riesling, Cranberry Jubilee and Dungeness Red is specially priced at $50.00.  Click here to order on-line.

On to the Pairing Principals!

Depending on where you are in your wine journey, the idea of pairing wine to food can be overwhelming.  This is especially true during the holidays when preparing a meal for several guests. Match Acidity with Acidity Acidic white wines, like our Madeleine Angevine have a crisp, citrusy tang. They pair well with any simply prepared shellfish, particularly oysters, but also seafood salad and vinaigrette. Acidic red wines, like our Dungeness Red Lemberger taste like a basket of fresh berries.  The acidity cuts through rich side dishes and doesn’t overpower lighter meats. Dungeness Red is delicious with a classic Thanksgiving Dinner. Offset Spice or Salt with Sweetness A slightly sweet white wine helps to cool spicy dishes.  Our Dungeness White Riesling pairs beautifully with Thai curry. Also, salty food like ham will pair well with a sweeter wine.  Think spiral ham glazed with cranberry orange sauce served with our Cranberry Jubilee. Yumm! Pair Light with Light Pork is a lighter meat, so you want to pair it with a medium bodied red wine.  Our 2014 Zinfandel is perfect with roast pork.  As a side note, Washington State Zinfandel is very different from California Zinfandel, which tends to be big and taste of purple fruits.  Washington Zin tends to be a little lighter and taste of red fruits like raspberries. These are dry red wines – not sweet Zinfandel Rose’ which is referred to as White Zin. Big Flavors with Big Red  Big reds, pair with hearty red meat.  A classic pairing is grilled steak with sautéed mushrooms and a Bordeaux Blend.  Our Winemaker’s Signature pairs beautifully with heartier foods. The tannins help balance the richness of a steak dinner allowing the flavors of the wine to shine. Sweet Wine with Dessert  The sugar in the dessert and the sweetness in the wine will balance.   My Sweet Syrah pairs well with anything chocolate, but pumpkin pie might be better with a fruitier white like our My Sweet Angevine or even Cranberry Jubilee.  Sweet Rose’ wine pairs well with creamy, mild desserts. Give Them What They Want If you know that Aunt Julie only drinks sweet, white wine, don’t bother trying to convince her that she will enjoy a full bodied Cabernet Sauvignon with her Beef Wellington.  It just won’t work for her. Pick up a bottle of something you know she enjoys and don’t wine shame.

Comments

Author: PT Steve

Date: 2017-12-08 10:18:52

Good article. What about for the dessert course. Fruits and sweets - like chocolate - don't always pair well with wines served during main course. What about late harvest / "ice" whites or Port?

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